Two semi-detached cottages form the centerpiece of the new garden courtyard created at Painter's Yard, London, United Kingdom

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Old Church Street

London, UK


In 1998, the practice was commissioned to produce a masterplan for the area around Chelsea Old Church in the heart of Old Chelsea. The client, a developer, expressed a clear desire to achieve good value through quality design, and to contribute new buildings that firmly fitted in with those existing in the locality to create a mixed residential development. The scheme included a design for a new church hall and a new vicarage and verger’s accommodation for Chelsea Old Church. The Masterplan involves 21 apartments, 4 town houses, 3 cottages, 4 maisonettes and a new church hall, vicarage and verger’s apartment. The scheme received the award for the best work within an existing historic neighbourhood from the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea, in 2004. HRH The Prince of Wales opened the Church Hall in 2001.

New arch to court created at Painter's Yard behind Old Church Street, London, United Kingdom

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Old Church Street

London, UK


The design is in the heart of the Chelsea Conservation area and involves an area of land along the eastern side of Old Church Street closest to the river. It includes 4 new town houses, 3 new cottages, 4 new maisonettes and 21 new apartments, as well as a Vicarage, a new Church Hall. Painter’s Yard is a new mixed used development in the heart of Old Chelsea. The site originally housed old industrial premises that had been partly bombed during the war. The scheme demolished an existing vicarage and church hall built in the 1970s. The Masterplan restores the street frontage to Old Church Street and creates courts at the rear through archways from the street. In addition to Painter’s Yard, an arched court, reminiscent of a cloister, was formed between the Church and the new Church Hall. A new vicarage and an apartment for a church warden were also incorporated. HRH The Prince of Wales opened the Church Hall in 2001.

View of the new Church Hall and Vicarage from Old Church Street, London, United Kingdom

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Old Church Street

London, UK


In 1998, the practice was commissioned to produce a masterplan for the area around Chelsea Old Church in the heart of Old Chelsea. The client, a developer, expressed a clear desire to achieve good value through quality design, and to contribute new buildings that firmly fitted in with those existing in the locality to create a mixed residential development. The scheme included a design for a new church hall and a new vicarage and verger’s accommodation for Chelsea Old Church. The Masterplan involves 21 apartments, 4 town houses, 3 cottages, 4 maisonettes and a new church hall, vicarage and verger’s apartment. The scheme received the award for the best work within an existing historic neighbourhood from the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea, in 2004. HRH The Prince of Wales opened the Church Hall in 2001. The buildings are built in traditional materials with London stock brick, soft red brick with slate and clay tile roofs and are designed so that, together with the existing buildings, they form consistent public spaces that seamlessly restore the continuity of the cityscape. This is especially pertinent in view of the fact that the buildings around Chelsea Old Church form the nucleus of what was once the historic centre of Chelsea. The project received the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Environment Award 2004.

View of the new Church Hall from the Cloister, Old Church Street, London, United Kingdom

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Old Church Street

London, UK


In 1998, the practice was commissioned to produce a masterplan for the area around Chelsea Old Church in the heart of Old Chelsea. The client, a developer, expressed a clear desire to achieve good value through quality design, and to contribute new buildings that firmly fitted in with those existing in the locality to create a mixed residential development. The scheme included a design for a new church hall and a new vicarage and verger’s accommodation for Chelsea Old Church. The Masterplan involves 21 apartments, 4 town houses, 3 cottages, 4 maisonettes and a new church hall, vicarage and verger’s apartment. The scheme received the award for the best work within an existing historic neighbourhood from the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea, in 2004. HRH The Prince of Wales opened the Church Hall in 2001. The buildings are built in traditional materials with London stock brick, soft red brick with slate and clay tile roofs and are designed so that, together with the existing buildings, they form consistent public spaces that seamlessly restore the continuity of the cityscape. This is especially pertinent in view of the fact that the buildings around Chelsea Old Church form the nucleus of what was once the historic centre of Chelsea. The project received the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Environment Award 2004.

View of portico to the new Church Hall, Old Church Street, London, United Kingdom

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Old Church Street

London, UK


In 1998, the practice was commissioned to produce a masterplan for the area around Chelsea Old Church in the heart of Old Chelsea. The client, a developer, expressed a clear desire to achieve good value through quality design, and to contribute new buildings that firmly fitted in with those existing in the locality to create a mixed residential development. The scheme included a design for a new church hall and a new vicarage and verger’s accommodation for Chelsea Old Church. The Masterplan involves 21 apartments, 4 town houses, 3 cottages, 4 maisonettes and a new church hall, vicarage and verger’s apartment. The scheme received the award for the best work within an existing historic neighbourhood from the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea, in 2004. HRH The Prince of Wales opened the Church Hall in 2001. The buildings are built in traditional materials with London stock brick, soft red brick with slate and clay tile roofs and are designed so that, together with the existing buildings, they form consistent public spaces that seamlessly restore the continuity of the cityscape. This is especially pertinent in view of the fact that the buildings around Chelsea Old Church form the nucleus of what was once the historic centre of Chelsea. The project received the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Environment Award 2004.

The new Church Hall has presence, despite being set back behind the Vicarage, Old Church Steet, London, United Kingdom

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Old Church Street

London, UK


In 1998, the practice was commissioned to produce a masterplan for the area around Chelsea Old Church in the heart of Old Chelsea. The client, a developer, expressed a clear desire to achieve good value through quality design, and to contribute new buildings that firmly fitted in with those existing in the locality to create a mixed residential development. The scheme included a design for a new church hall and a new vicarage and verger’s accommodation for Chelsea Old Church. The Masterplan involves 21 apartments, 4 town houses, 3 cottages, 4 maisonettes and a new church hall, vicarage and verger’s apartment. The scheme received the award for the best work within an existing historic neighbourhood from the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea, in 2004. HRH The Prince of Wales opened the Church Hall in 2001. The buildings are built in traditional materials with London stock brick, soft red brick with slate and clay tile roofs and are designed so that, together with the existing buildings, they form consistent public spaces that seamlessly restore the continuity of the cityscape. This is especially pertinent in view of the fact that the buildings around Chelsea Old Church form the nucleus of what was once the historic centre of Chelsea. The project received the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Environment Award 2004.

View of the new residential development and Vicarage from Old Church Street, London, United Kingdom

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Old Church Street

London, UK


In 1998, the practice was commissioned to produce a masterplan for the area around Chelsea Old Church in the heart of Old Chelsea. The client, a developer, expressed a clear desire to achieve good value through quality design, and to contribute new buildings that firmly fitted in with those existing in the locality to create a mixed residential development. The scheme included a design for a new church hall and a new vicarage and verger’s accommodation for Chelsea Old Church. The Masterplan involves 21 apartments, 4 town houses, 3 cottages, 4 maisonettes and a new church hall, vicarage and verger’s apartment. The scheme received the award for the best work within an existing historic neighbourhood from the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea, in 2004. HRH The Prince of Wales opened the Church Hall in 2001. The buildings are built in traditional materials with London stock brick, soft red brick with slate and clay tile roofs and are designed so that, together with the existing buildings, they form consistent public spaces that seamlessly restore the continuity of the cityscape. This is especially pertinent in view of the fact that the buildings around Chelsea Old Church form the nucleus of what was once the historic centre of Chelsea. The project received the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Environment Award 2004.

The new Vicarage entrance portico at 2 Old Church Street looking towards the Embankment, London, United Kingdom

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Old Church Street

London, UK


In 1998, the practice was commissioned to produce a masterplan for the area around Chelsea Old Church in the heart of Old Chelsea. The client, a developer, expressed a clear desire to achieve good value through quality design, and to contribute new buildings that firmly fitted in with those existing in the locality to create a mixed residential development. The scheme included a design for a new church hall and a new vicarage and verger’s accommodation for Chelsea Old Church. The Masterplan involves 21 apartments, 4 town houses, 3 cottages, 4 maisonettes and a new church hall, vicarage and verger’s apartment. The scheme received the award for the best work within an existing historic neighbourhood from the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea, in 2004. HRH The Prince of Wales opened the Church Hall in 2001. The buildings are built in traditional materials with London stock brick, soft red brick with slate and clay tile roofs and are designed so that, together with the existing buildings, they form consistent public spaces that seamlessly restore the continuity of the cityscape. This is especially pertinent in view of the fact that the buildings around Chelsea Old Church form the nucleus of what was once the historic centre of Chelsea. The project received the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Environment Award 2004.

The new development at Old Church Street comprising a new Church Hall, Vicarage House and Cottage on the cleared site adjacent to Chelsea Old Church, London, United Kingdom

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Old Church Street

London, UK


In 1998, the practice was commissioned to produce a masterplan for the area around Chelsea Old Church in the heart of Old Chelsea. The client, a developer, expressed a clear desire to achieve good value through quality design, and to contribute new buildings that firmly fitted in with those existing in the locality to create a mixed residential development. The scheme included a design for a new church hall and a new vicarage and verger’s accommodation for Chelsea Old Church. The Masterplan involves 21 apartments, 4 town houses, 3 cottages, 4 maisonettes and a new church hall, vicarage and verger’s apartment. The scheme received the award for the best work within an existing historic neighbourhood from the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea, in 2004. HRH The Prince of Wales opened the Church Hall in 2001. The buildings are built in traditional materials with London stock brick, soft red brick with slate and clay tile roofs and are designed so that, together with the existing buildings, they form consistent public spaces that seamlessly restore the continuity of the cityscape. This is especially pertinent in view of the fact that the buildings around Chelsea Old Church form the nucleus of what was once the historic centre of Chelsea. The project received the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Environment Award 2004.